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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 371832, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/371832
Review Article

Physical and Functional HAT/HDAC Interplay Regulates Protein Acetylation Balance

Laboratory of Signal-Dependent Transcription, Department of Translational Pharmacology (DTP), Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, 66030 Chieti, Italy

Received 15 July 2010; Revised 1 October 2010; Accepted 27 October 2010

Academic Editor: Christian Seiser

Copyright © 2011 Alessia Peserico and Cristiano Simone. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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