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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 383962, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/383962
Review Article

Role of Interleukin-10 in Malaria: Focusing on Coinfection with Lethal and Nonlethal Murine Malaria Parasites

Department of Infectious Diseases, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo 181-8611, Japan

Received 23 May 2011; Revised 23 August 2011; Accepted 23 August 2011

Academic Editor: Luis I. Terrazas

Copyright © 2011 Mamoru Niikura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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