About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 413802, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/413802
Research Article

Technetium-99m-Labeled Autologous Serum Albumin: A Personal-Exclusive Source of Serum Component

1College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 97004, Taiwan
2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan
3Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan
4Department of Hematology and Oncology, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan
5Department of Pharmacy, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan

Received 31 December 2010; Accepted 3 March 2011

Academic Editor: Lie-Hang Shen

Copyright © 2011 Yuh-Feng Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Technetium-99m human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) is an important radiopharmaceutical required in nuclear medicine studies. However, the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection remains a major safety concern. Autopreparation of serum component acquired from patient provides a “personal-exclusive” source for radiolabeling. This paper is to evaluate the practicality of on-site elusion and subsequent radiolabeling efficacy for serum albumin. Results showed that the autologous elute contained more albumin fraction than serum without extraction procedure. Good radiochemical purity and stability were demonstrated after radiolabeling. Biodistribution study showed that labeled albumin accumulated immediately in the lung, liver, and kidney. It was cleared steadily and excreted in the urine. The biologic half-life was defined, and all samples passed the pyrogenicity and sterility tests. In conclusion, autoalbumin could be extracted and radiolabeled properly in a nuclear medicine setting. Moreover, the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection associated with nonautologous, multisource 99mTc-HSA agents can be reduced.