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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 463412, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/463412
Review Article

Regulatory T-Cell-Associated Cytokines in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received 28 July 2011; Accepted 8 September 2011

Academic Editor: Brian Poole

Copyright © 2011 Akiko Okamoto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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