473983.fig.006a
(a)
473983.fig.006b
(b)
473983.fig.006c
(c)
473983.fig.006d
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473983.fig.006e
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473983.fig.006f
(f)
Figure 6: The intravacuolar MNN plays a structural role in keeping parasites tightly organized as “rosettes” during endodiogeny. (a–f) SEM-Tanaka micrographs of MDCK cells, infected by ΔGRA2 mutant for 1, 6, 12, and 24 h, show loss of the MNN and alteration of interparasite cohesion within the PV. Arrows in (c–f) indicate residual amorphous and fibrous material at the parasites posterior end instead of the typical RB. Arrowheads in (d) show membranous fibers linking parasites together and to the PVM. Asterisks in (a–f) indicate an apparent empty space at the PV’s periphery. μm.