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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 476723, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/476723
Research Article

Construction, Characterization, and Preliminary BAC-End Sequence Analysis of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis)

1School of Plant Sciences, Arizona Genomics Institute, The University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USA
2Department of Tea Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002, China
3BIO5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USA

Received 29 July 2010; Accepted 28 October 2010

Academic Editor: Yong Lim

Copyright © 2011 Jinke Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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