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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 569628, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/569628
Review Article

The Sarcomeric Z-Disc and Z-Discopathies

Centre for Research Excellence, British Heart Foundation, National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College, South Kensington Campus, Flowers Building, 4th Floor, London SW7 2AZ, UK

Received 5 July 2011; Accepted 12 August 2011

Academic Editor: Henk Granzier

Copyright © 2011 Ralph Knöll et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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