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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 924898, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/924898
Review Article

Elongator: An Ancestral Complex Driving Transcription and Migration through Protein Acetylation

Chromatin and Cell Fate Group, Institute for Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer (IMPPC), 08916 Badalona, Spain

Received 14 July 2010; Accepted 5 December 2010

Academic Editor: Patrick Matthias

Copyright © 2011 Catherine Creppe and Marcus Buschbeck. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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