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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 969618, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/969618
Review Article

Surgical Approaches to Create Murine Models of Human Wound Healing

Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, GK210, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

Received 12 September 2010; Accepted 26 October 2010

Academic Editor: Andrea Vecchione

Copyright © 2011 Victor W. Wong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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