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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 981214, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/981214
Review Article

The Gut Microbiota and Human Health with an Emphasis on the Use of Microencapsulated Bacterial Cells

Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physiology and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4

Received 19 November 2010; Revised 16 February 2011; Accepted 11 April 2011

Academic Editor: Eric C. Martens

Copyright © 2011 Satya Prakash et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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