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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 156795, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/156795
Review Article

α-Enolase, a Multifunctional Protein: Its Role on Pathophysiological Situations

Biological Clues of the Invasive and Metastatic Phenotype Research Group, (IDIBELL) Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08908 Barcelona, Spain

Received 15 May 2012; Accepted 25 June 2012

Academic Editor: Lindsey A. Miles

Copyright © 2012 Àngels Díaz-Ramos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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