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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 208204, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/208204
Review Article

Ectonucleotidases in Solid Organ and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Freiburg University Medical Center, Albert-Ludwigs-University, 79106 Freiburg, Germany

Received 20 May 2012; Accepted 10 July 2012

Academic Editor: Linda F. Thompson

Copyright © 2012 Petya Chernogorova and Robert Zeiser. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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