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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 248764, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/248764
Review Article

Role of Calcium and Mitochondria in MeHg-Mediated Cytotoxicity

1Departamento de Química, CCNE, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Bioquímica Toxicológica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105.900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
2Universidade Federal do Pampa-Campus Uruguaiana, BR-472 Km 7, 97500-970 Uruguaiana, RS, Brazil

Received 6 April 2012; Revised 12 June 2012; Accepted 14 June 2012

Academic Editor: Marcelo Farina

Copyright © 2012 Daniel Roos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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