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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 272148, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/272148
Review Article

Bacterial Plasminogen Receptors: Mediators of a Multifaceted Relationship

Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute and School of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia

Received 23 March 2012; Accepted 7 June 2012

Academic Editor: Lindsey A. Miles

Copyright © 2012 Martina L. Sanderson-Smith et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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