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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 353687, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/353687
Review Article

The Biochemistry and Regulation of S100A10: A Multifunctional Plasminogen Receptor Involved in Oncogenesis

1Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, University of Algarve, Campus of Gambelas, FCT Bld. 8, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
2Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 1500, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2
3Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 1500, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2

Received 9 April 2012; Accepted 1 June 2012

Academic Editor: Lindsey A. Miles

Copyright © 2012 Patricia A. Madureira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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