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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 359879, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/359879
Research Article

Biomarkers of Adverse Response to Mercury: Histopathology versus Thioredoxin Reductase Activity

1Research Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Avenue Professor Gama Pinto, 1649-003 Lisbon, Portugal
2Marine Environment and Biodiversity Unit, Institute for Sea and Atmospheric Research (IPIMAR/IPMA), Avenue Brasília, 1440-006 Lisbon, Portugal
3Aquaculture Unit, Institute for Sea and Atmospheric Research (IPIMAR/IPMA), Avenue Brasília, 1440-006 Lisbon, Portugal
4Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 20 April 2012; Accepted 25 May 2012

Academic Editor: João B.T. Rocha

Copyright © 2012 Vasco Branco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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