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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 464532, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/464532
Review Article

The Role of Costimulatory Receptors of the Tumour Necrosis Factor Receptor Family in Atherosclerosis

Cardiac and Vascular Sciences, Division of Clinical Sciences, St. George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, SW17 0RE, UK

Received 31 August 2011; Accepted 11 October 2011

Academic Editor: Byoung S. Kwon

Copyright © 2012 Ricardo F. Antunes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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