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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 472537, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/472537
Review Article

Viral Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: Generation, Mutagenesis, and Removal of Mini-F Sequences

Institut für Virologie, Freie Universität Berlin, Philippstraße 13, 10115 Berlin, Germany

Received 15 August 2011; Revised 21 October 2011; Accepted 27 October 2011

Academic Editor: Jiing-Kuan Yee

Copyright © 2012 B. Karsten Tischer and Benedikt B. Kaufer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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