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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 482096, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/482096
Review Article

Bacterial Plasminogen Receptors Utilize Host Plasminogen System for Effective Invasion and Dissemination

1W. M. Keck Center for Transgene Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA

Received 5 April 2012; Revised 24 July 2012; Accepted 13 August 2012

Academic Editor: David M. Waisman

Copyright © 2012 Sarbani Bhattacharya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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