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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 564259, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/564259
Review Article

Cell Surface Remodeling by Plasmin: A New Function for an Old Enzyme

Department of Cell Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

Received 2 May 2012; Accepted 1 June 2012

Academic Editor: Lindsey A. Miles

Copyright © 2012 Elena I. Deryugina and James P. Quigley. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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