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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 568567, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/568567
Review Article

Patient-Derived Xenografts of Non Small Cell Lung Cancer: Resurgence of an Old Model for Investigation of Modern Concepts of Tailored Therapy and Cancer Stem Cells

1Tumor Genomics Unit, Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, IRCCS Foundation National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan, Italy
2Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, IRCCS Foundation National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan, Italy
3Thoracic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Foundation National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan, Italy

Received 28 December 2011; Accepted 10 January 2012

Academic Editor: Andrea Vecchione

Copyright © 2012 Massimo Moro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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