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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 601560, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/601560
Review Article

Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

1GIGA-Neurosciences, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium
2GIGA-Development, Stem cells and Regeneative Medicine, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium
3Neurology Department, CHU, 4000 Liège, Belgium

Received 11 July 2011; Accepted 21 October 2011

Academic Editor: Ken-ichi Isobe

Copyright © 2012 Sabine Wislet-Gendebien et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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