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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 639562, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/639562
Research Article

Detection of Canonical Hedgehog Signaling in Breast Cancer by 131-Iodine-Labeled Derivatives of the Sonic Hedgehog Protein

1Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE 19713, USA
2RadioMedix, Inc., Houston, TX 77042, USA
3Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
4Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 70030, USA
5Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA

Received 29 February 2012; Revised 23 April 2012; Accepted 7 May 2012

Academic Editor: Lie-Hang Shen

Copyright © 2012 Jennifer Sims-Mourtada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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