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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 675317, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/675317
Review Article

The Role of T-Cell Leukemia Translocation-Associated Gene Protein in Human Tumorigenesis and Osteoclastogenesis

Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 10-22 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0054, Japan

Received 1 August 2011; Accepted 29 September 2011

Academic Editor: Byoung S. Kwon

Copyright © 2012 Shigeru Kotake et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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