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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 692609, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/692609
Review Article

Animal Models of Glaucoma

1Department of Ophthalmology, Summa Health System, Akron, OH 44304, USA
2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA
3Research Department, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, P.O. Box 7191, Riyadh 11462, Saudi Arabia

Received 16 January 2012; Revised 27 February 2012; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2012 Rachida A. Bouhenni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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