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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 758102, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/758102
Review Article

Toward Personalized Cell Therapies by Using Stem Cells: Seven Relevant Topics for Safety and Success in Stem Cell Therapy

1Post-Graduation Program in Biotechnology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Laboratory of Genetics, Department of Biology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora 36036-900, MG, Brazil
3Restorative Dentistry Department, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 16 June 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editor: Herman S. Cheung

Copyright © 2012 Fernando de Sá Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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