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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 817341, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/817341
Review Article

Think Small: Zebrafish as a Model System of Human Pathology

1Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
2Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

Received 9 January 2012; Accepted 12 March 2012

Academic Editor: Andrea Vecchione

Copyright © 2012 J. R. Goldsmith and Christian Jobin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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