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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 845618, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/845618
Review Article

Classic and New Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

1Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
2Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
3Department of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 9 January 2012; Accepted 23 January 2012

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2012 Javier Blesa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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