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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 102570, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/102570
Research Article

Modeling the Prospective Relationships of Impairment, Injury Severity, and Participation to Quality of Life Following Traumatic Brain Injury

1Department of Educational Psychology, 4225 TAMU, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845-4225, USA
2Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
3Injury Control Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

Received 25 April 2013; Revised 14 August 2013; Accepted 28 August 2013

Academic Editor: Corina O. Bondi

Copyright © 2013 Ryan J. Kalpinski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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