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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 121794, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/121794
Research Article

Participation of Chloride Channels in the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of a Fatty Acid Mixture

1Laboratorio de Neurofarmacología, Instituto de Neuroetología, Universidad Veracruzana, 91190 Xalapa, VER, Mexico
2Unidad Periférica Xalapa, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 91190 Xalapa, VER, Mexico

Received 4 April 2013; Accepted 20 August 2013

Academic Editor: Brynn Levy

Copyright © 2013 Juan Francisco Rodríguez-Landa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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