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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 125492, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/125492
Research Article

A Novel Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 Mutant Mouse, , Displays Impaired Intracellular Handling in Skeletal Muscle

1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, 775-A WIDB, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
3Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA

Received 18 June 2013; Revised 12 October 2013; Accepted 29 October 2013

Academic Editor: Kunikazu Tsuji

Copyright © 2013 Laura C. Bridgewater et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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