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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 125671, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/125671
Research Article

Effect of Nerium oleander (N.O.) Leaves Extract on Serum hepcidin, Total Iron, and Infiltration of ED1 Positive Cells in Albino Rat

1Department of Zoology, Government College of Science, Wahdat Road, Lahore 54590, Pakistan
2Cell and Molecular Biology Lab, Department of Zoology, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan
3University of Health Sciences, Lahore 54590, Pakistan
4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Goettingen, 37075 Goettingen, Germany

Received 16 April 2013; Revised 22 July 2013; Accepted 26 July 2013

Academic Editor: Francesco D'Amico

Copyright © 2013 Muddasir Hassan Abbasi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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