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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 139813, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/139813
Research Article

Factors Influencing Women's Decision to Participate or Not in a Surgical Randomised Controlled Trial for Surgical Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

1Division of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, 2nd Floor, Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK
2Division of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Academic Urology Unit, 2nd Floor Health Sciences Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK

Received 29 April 2013; Accepted 29 July 2013

Academic Editor: Charnita M. Zeigler-Johnson

Copyright © 2013 Alyaa Mostafa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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