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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 142492, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/142492
Review Article

Innate Immunity Modulation by the IL-33/ST2 System in Intestinal Mucosa

1Disciplinary Program of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
2Cell and Molecular Biology Program, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
3Gastroenterology Unit, Las Condes Clinic, Santiago, Chile

Received 14 September 2012; Accepted 29 October 2012

Academic Editor: Thomas Griffith

Copyright © 2013 Marina García-Miguel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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