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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 143092, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/143092
Research Article

Traumatic Brain Injury Related Hospitalization and Mortality in California

1Charles R Drew University of Medicine & Science, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 1731 East 120th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
2Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Charles R Drew University of Medicine, 1731 East 120th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
3Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, USA
4Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, College of Medicine, 1731 East 120th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
5Department of Research, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, 1731 East 120th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA

Received 17 July 2013; Revised 16 September 2013; Accepted 16 September 2013

Academic Editor: Andrew Ducruet

Copyright © 2013 Clint Lagbas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. The aim of this study is to describe the traumatic brain injury (TBI) population and causes and identify factors associated with TBI hospitalizations and mortality in California. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study of 61,188 patients with TBI from the California Hospital Discharge Data 2001 to 2009. We used descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses in SAS version 9.3. Results. TBI-related hospitalizations decreased by 14% and mortality increased by 19% from 2001 to 2009. The highest percentages of TBI hospitalizations were due to other causes (38.4%), falls (31.2%), being of age years old (37.2%), being a males (58.9%), and being of Medicare patients (44%). TBIs due to falls were found in those age years old (53.5%), years old (44.0%), and females (37.2%). TBIs due to assaults were more frequent in Blacks (29.0%). TBIs due to motor vehicle accidents were more frequent in 15–19 and 20–24 age groups (48.7% and 48.6%, resp.) and among Hispanics (27.8%). Higher odds of mortality were found among motor vehicle accident category (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.27, 95% CI: 1.14–1.41); males (AOR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.27–1.46); and the -year-old group (AOR: 6.4, 95% CI: 4.9–8.4). Conclusions. Our findings suggest a decrease in TBI-related hospitalizations but an increase in TBI-related mortality during the study period. The majority of TBI-related hospitalizations was due to other causes and falls and was more frequent in the older, male, and Medicare populations. The higher likelihood of TBI-related mortalities was found among elderly male years old who had motor vehicle accidents. Our data can inform practitioners, prevention planners, educators, service sectors, and policy makers who aim to reduce the burden of TBI in the community. Implications for interventions are discussed.