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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 146079, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/146079
Research Article

The Association of the Immune Response Genes to Human Papillomavirus-Related Cervical Disease in a Brazilian Population

1Campinas State University, Rua Carlos Chagas 480, Barão Geraldo, 13083878 Campinas, SP, Brazil
2Basic Health Sciences Department, Maringa State University, Avenue Colombo 5790, 87020900 Maringá, PR, Brazil
3Pathology Sciences Department, Londrina State University, Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid (PR 445), 86051-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
4Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, Maringa State University, Avenue Colombo 5790, 87020900 Maringá, PR, Brazil
5Program of Biosciences Applied to Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, Maringa State University, Avenue Colombo 5790, 87020900 Maringá, PR, Brazil

Received 29 March 2013; Revised 5 June 2013; Accepted 15 June 2013

Academic Editor: Enrique Medina-Acosta

Copyright © 2013 Amanda Vansan Marangon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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