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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 148348, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/148348
Research Article

Gradient Evolution of Body Colouration in Surface- and Cave-Dwelling Poecilia mexicana and the Role of Phenotype-Assortative Female Mate Choice

1Evolutionary Ecology Group, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University of Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Street 13, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2Department of Biology and Ecology of Fishes, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin, Germany
3Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
4División Académica de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT), 86150 Villahermosa, TAB, Mexico

Received 30 April 2013; Accepted 16 August 2013

Academic Editor: Alex Greenwood

Copyright © 2013 David Bierbach et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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