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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 158746, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/158746
Review Article

Psychomotor Retardation in Depression: A Systematic Review of Diagnostic, Pathophysiologic, and Therapeutic Implications

1Department of Clinical Psychiatry, University Hospital of Besançon, 25030 Besançon, France
2EA 481 Neuroscience, IFR 133, University of Franche-Comte, 25030 Besançon, France
3INSERM U1093 Cognition, Action, et Plasticité Sensorimotrice, University of Bourgogne, UFR STAPS, 21078 Dijon, France
4University of Bourgogne, UFR STAPS, 21078 Dijon, France
5Institut Universitaire de France, University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France
6Clinical Investigation Centre CIC-IT 808 INSERM, University Hospital of Besançon, 25030 Besançon, France

Received 14 May 2013; Revised 26 July 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Michael Rapp

Copyright © 2013 Djamila Bennabi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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