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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 161687, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/161687
Review Article

Early Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease Pathology in Urban Children: Friend versus Foe Responses—It Is Time to Face the Evidence

1Center for Structural and Functional Neurosciences, The University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Skaggs Building 287, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
2Departamento de Investigación, Hospital Central Militar, Secretaria de la Defensa Nacional, 11649 México, DF, Mexico
3Departamentos de Radiología y Patología Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, 04530 México, DF, Mexico
4Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF, Mexico

Received 7 November 2012; Revised 1 January 2013; Accepted 1 January 2013

Academic Editor: Tim Nawrot

Copyright © 2013 Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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