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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 172479, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/172479
Research Article

Soluble Form of Canine Transferrin Receptor Inhibits Canine Parvovirus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo

1Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baodiing 071001, China
2Hebei Engineering and Technology Research Center of Veterinary Biological Products, North China Research Center of Animal Epidemic Pathogen Biology, China Agriculture Ministry, Baoding 071001, China
3Laboratory of Virology, College of Animal Science, Hebei Normal University of Science and Technology, Qinhuangdao 066600, China
4Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL 60153, USA
5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL 60153, USA
6Department of Biotechnology, College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, China

Received 18 April 2013; Accepted 25 July 2013

Academic Editor: Lucia Lopalco

Copyright © 2013 Jiexia Wen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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