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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 179174, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/179174
Review Article

Pattern Recognition Receptors and Cytokines in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection—The Double-Edged Sword?

1School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
2Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Received 13 March 2013; Revised 16 September 2013; Accepted 27 September 2013

Academic Editor: Gernot Zissel

Copyright © 2013 Md. Murad Hossain and Mohd-Nor Norazmi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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