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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 179784, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/179784
Review Article

Skin Basement Membrane: The Foundation of Epidermal Integrity—BM Functions and Diverse Roles of Bridging Molecules Nidogen and Perlecan

1Department of Dermatology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Strasse 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany
2DGZ, Post Office Box, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69009 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 10 August 2012; Revised 18 January 2013; Accepted 28 January 2013

Academic Editor: George E. Plopper

Copyright © 2013 Dirk Breitkreutz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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