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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 181564, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/181564
Research Article

Spectrum of Bacterial Keratitis at a Tertiary Eye Care Centre in India

Department of Ocular Microbiology, Institute of Ophthalmology, Joseph Eye Hospital, Trichy, Tamil Nadu 620001, India

Received 27 April 2013; Accepted 27 July 2013

Academic Editor: Vishal Jhanji

Copyright © 2013 Jayaraman Kaliamurthy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. To report the aetiological spectrum and susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from patients with corneal ulceration. Method. The microbiological data of all patients with suspected infectious corneal ulceration who presented to the ocular microbiology service at this centre between 2005 and 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Result. Microorganisms were recovered from 1665 (77%) of the 2170 ulcers. Bacterial isolates accounted for 1205 of the organisms isolated. The most common bacterial pathogens isolated were various species of Staphylococcus, representing 777 (64.5%), followed by Staphylococcus spp. (148; 12.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (117; 9.7%). High percentages of Gram-positive bacteria were susceptible to gatifloxacin (>94%), followed by ofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Almost 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Sixty-two (44%) of 140 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 79 (14.8%) of 534 isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, and 33 (14%) of 234 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Conclusion. Staphylococcus spp. were the most common bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with keratitis in this setting. High percentages of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin, respectively. Interestingly, a high percentage of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were found to be resistant to three or more antibiotics.