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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 194765, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/194765
Research Article

Wild Plant Assessment for Heavy Metal Phytoremediation Potential along the Mafic and Ultramafic Terrain in Northern Pakistan

1Department of Earth Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan
2National Center of Excellence in Geology, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25120, Pakistan
3Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25120, Pakistan
4Department of Chemistry, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200, Pakistan
5Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320, Pakistan
6Department of Environmental Sciences, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200, Pakistan

Received 16 April 2013; Accepted 17 July 2013

Academic Editor: George Perry

Copyright © 2013 Said Muhammad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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