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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 206061, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/206061
Research Article

Induction of Mast-Cell Accumulation by Promutoxin, an Arg-49 Phospholipase

1Clinical Experiment Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
2Allergy and Inflammation Research Institute, The Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041, China
3Research Division of Clinical Pharmacology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China

Received 23 July 2012; Accepted 11 September 2012

Academic Editor: Luis A. Ponce Soto

Copyright © 2013 Ji-Fu Wei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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