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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 209204, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/209204
Research Article

Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

1Servicio de Genética, Hospital General de México, Dr. Balmis No. 148, Colonia Doctores, 06726 México, DF, Mexico
2Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF, Mexico
3Departamento de Medicina Genómica, Hospital General de México, Dr. Balmis No. 148, Colonia, Doctores, 06726 México, DF, Mexico

Received 26 October 2012; Accepted 13 December 2012

Academic Editor: Ozgur Cogulu

Copyright © 2013 Carlos A. Venegas-Vega et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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