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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 218970, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/218970
Research Article

Repeated Bout Effect Was More Expressed in Young Adult Males Than in Elderly Males and Boys

1Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Research Centre for Fundamental and Clinical Movement Sciences, Lithuanian Sports University, Sporto 6, 4422 Kaunas, Lithuania
2Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma, Lenox Hill Hospital, 130 East 77th Street, New York, NY 10075, USA

Received 3 September 2012; Revised 12 November 2012; Accepted 10 December 2012

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Spinella

Copyright © 2013 Giedrius Gorianovas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study investigated possible differences using the same stretch-shortening exercise (SSE) protocol on generally accepted monitoring markers (dependent variables: changes in creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and voluntary and electrically evoked torque) in males across three lifespan stages (childhood versus adulthood versus old age). The protocol consisted of 100 intermittent (30 s interval between jumps) drop jumps to determine the repeated bout effect (RBE) (first and second bouts performed at a 2-week interval). The results showed that indirect symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage after SSE were more expressed in adult males than in boys and elderly males, suggesting that the muscles of boys and elderly males are more resistant to exercise-induced damage than those of adult males. RBE was more pronounced in adult males than in boys and elderly males, suggesting that the muscles of boys and elderly males are less adaptive to exercise-induced muscle damage than those of adult males.