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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 241780, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/241780
Research Article

Circulating microRNAs and Kallikreins before and after Radical Prostatectomy: Are They Really Prostate Cancer Markers?

1Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Loc. S. Andrea delle Fratte, 06156 Perugia, Italy
2Department of Biopathological Science and Hygiene of Food and Animal Production, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, Via San Costanzo 4, 06126 Perugia, Italy

Received 10 May 2013; Revised 9 August 2013; Accepted 23 August 2013

Academic Editor: Romonia Renee Reams

Copyright © 2013 Maria Giulia Egidi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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