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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 252356, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/252356
Clinical Study

Hip Fracture Surgery: Does Type of Anesthesia Matter?

1Section of Orthopedics, Department of Surgery, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi 74800, Pakistan
2Aga Khan Medical College, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi 74800, Pakistan

Received 6 April 2013; Accepted 11 May 2013

Academic Editor: Frankie Leung

Copyright © 2013 Rizwan Haroon Rashid et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Hip fracture surgery is a common procedure, and the geriatric population with its multiple comorbid conditions is at most at risk of developing anesthesia-related complications. Data on the impact of type anesthesia on postoperative morbidity and mortality is limited. The effects of regional and general anesthesia on postoperative outcomes need to be clearly elucidated. Methods. In this study, all patients who underwent dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation for intertrochanteric fractures, between January 2005 and December 2010, at the Aga Khan University Hospital, were included. Patients were divided into two groups; group A included those patients who received general anesthesia, and group B consisted of patients who had received regional anesthesia. The two groups were compared for differences in morbidity, mortality, and intraoperative complications based on the type of anesthesia administered. Results. During this period, 194 patients underwent DHS fixation. One hundred and seven patients received general anesthesia whereas eighty-seven patients received regional anesthesia. The mean operative time was significantly lower in the group receiving regional anesthesia (  hrs) as compared to those who received general anesthesia (  hrs) ( ). There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of wound infections, length of hospital stay, postoperative ambulation status, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications, and mortality between the regional and general anesthesia groups. Conclusion. Even though administration of regional anesthesia was positively correlated with shorter operative duration, the type of anesthesia was not found to affect surgical outcomes in the two study groups. Based on these results, we recommend that anesthesia should be tailored to individual patient requirements.