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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 264314, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/264314
Review Article

The Role of Canonical and Noncanonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plant Stress Responses

Laboratory of Biotechnology, Institute of Biology and Soil Science, Far East Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok 690022, Russia

Received 3 August 2012; Revised 2 October 2012; Accepted 11 October 2012

Academic Editor: Juan Francisco Jiménez Bremont

Copyright © 2013 A. S. Dubrovina et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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